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liO'^'Z 



\ I \. lltr .\m J^-IV- 



MODERN PRINCIPLES 

IN 

PAINT & 
DECORATION 



UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY 







mmmm 



M09-3 



A NEW MEDIUM 
FOR DECORATIVE FINISHES 

• Practical and reliable \vt)rking data on ihc selection and specifica- 
tion of modern water-thinned paints are contained in this Manual. 
In presenting these paint products to architects and interior decora- 
tors, the U. S. Gypsum Clompany feels that it is making^ a definite 
contribution to the advancement of decorating practice. 

A new principle in paint composition is involved that contributes 
qualities and characteristics not found in other types of paints. Advan- 
tages include purity of color, high light reflective characteristics, free- 
dom from paint odor and fire hazards, quick drying and ease of appli- 
cation. Color qualities hitherto obtainable only in tempera and fresco 
are secured with these new water-thinned paints employing a protein- 
base vehicle allied to some of the modern plastics. 

This Manual describes the new principle employed in the com- 
pounding of these paints and presents its qualifications and limita- 
tions in simple terms. It contains explicit instructions for the prepa- 
ration of all types of surfaces and for the creation of flat or textured 
finishes within the wide range of effects possible with these materials. 
C'omplete specifications can be written directK" from this working data. 



Copyright PJ.i7 



UNITED STATES 
GYPSUM COMPANY 



Chicago, Illinuis 

Sales Offices al: 

Atlanta. Ga. Kansas City. Mo. 

Baltimore, Md. Los Angeies. Calif. 

BirnjinKham, Ala. Milwaukee Wis 

Boston. Mas.. Minneapolis. M.nn. 

Buffalo. N. Y. New York, N. Y. 

Cincinnati. Ohio Omaha. Neh. 

C leveland, Ohio Philadelphia. Pa. 

Dallas, Tex Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Uenver, Colo. Portland. Ore. 

Detroit. Mich. St. Louis, Mo. 

Houston. Tex. San Francisco. Calif. 

Indianapolis. Ind. Washington, D. C 



J I I 



MODERN 
PRINCIPLES 



I N 




Ca4ynZ^ tylyfl^ 




^e^ca 




UNITED STATES GYPSUM COM? A N Y 



UaS 

o 



m^' r 



WHAT, 

WHY, 

WH ERE, 

WHEN AND HOW 



This is a manual on the use of various types of modern water- 
thinned fiat paints, colors and decorative texturing materials 
manufactured by United States Gypsum Company, rather than 
a catalog of these products. Its purpose is to help you know what 
these products are for, what they will do and not do, \vhere they 
ma>- be used most advantageously and how to employ them cor- 
rectly. It seeks to indicate why and when each type of paint 
deserves preference over others, recognizing that no one paint 
product will meet every requirement of cost, durabilitv and 
appearance. Vou will fmd this manual entirely free of claims and 
assertions that are not supported by research and field experi- 
ence. Every statement made herein has been checked by labora- 
tory and field technicians and represents the best knowledge 
available to date. If you find new uses, new application prob- 
lems or ^e^^ techniques relating to these products that are not 
satisfactorih covered n, th.s manual, you are cordially invited 
to ^vrite to the Manager. Paint Division, United States Gvpsum 
Companv. Clh.cago. or to the nearest branch office about your 
discoveries or needs. 



1 



WHERE TO FIND THE FACTS 
ABOUT: 



3 

T 


i 



SEE PACE 

ll^TEBIOR DECORATING PROBLEMS 

The "Background of Beauty" in interior decoration 13 

The proper selection of colors 19 

Mixing and blending colors 22 

Colors available in USG paint products 20 

Textures and when to use them 34 

Modern texture eflfects, and how to produce them 35 

Stencilling, and how it is done 37 

Glazing and antiquing 38 

Light reflection and diffusion values in decoration 9 

THE PROPERTIES OF 

MODERN WATER-THINNED PAINTS 

The new principle in paint composition 7 

Properties of modern water-thinned vehicles 8 

Properties of paints using these modern vehicles . . 9 

Drying time 9 

Freedom from paint odor and fire hazard 9 

Light reflecting and diffusing properties 9 

Durability 10 

Washability 10 

NIaintenance and redecoration 39 

WHERE TO USE 

MODERN WATER'THINNED PAINTS 

For true color values in all applications 13 

For high efficiency in modern lighting . 9 

Residences and apartments 13 

Offices, private and general 14 

Stores and shops 14 



SEE PACE 

Hospitals 15 

Schools 15 

Industrial buildings 15 

HOW TO SELECT THE PROPER PAINT 

For comparative data in chart form 16 

For selection according to job conditions see 
"Preparation" and "Finishing Coats" below 
23 to 38 inch 

For exterior painting 28 

PREPARATION OF SURFACES 
FOR PAINTING OR TEXTURING 

Gypsum wallboards 24 

Plaster 26 

Fiber wallboards 27 

Wood, metals, etc 27 

Masonry 28 

FINISHING COATS — PAINTING AND TEXTURING 

Flat painted finishes with Texolite, Texolitc Deep 
Colors. 31 

Calcimine finishes with Duracal, Kal, L'SG C'old 
Water Calcimine 32 

Modern texture finishes with Textonc and L'SG 
Texture Paint 34 

Stencilled decorative treatments with Textonc. ... 37 

Glazing, blending and antic|uingertccts over Textonc 38 

CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE 

Proper methods of washing painted walls 39 

Washing versus redecorating 39 



M 



MODERN PAINTS THAT BRING 




'^e^u^ 



TO INTERIOR DECORATION 




• When chemists started to change cotton into 
rayon, milk into billiard balls and glues, soy beans 
into steering wheels, and all manner of materials 
into modern plastics, they found a limited group of 
new compounds that has solved an age-old problem 
of artists and decorators. They discovered a new 
"vehicle" for paint pigments that keeps colors clear 
and true, that increases light reflection, improves 
with age, adheres perfectly and that is free from 
paint odor, quick-drying and fire-safe. 

For centuries architects and decorators have 
sought purity in colors for their interior finishes; 
colors that would not darken with age. It is a char- 
acteristic of the oils used in oil paints that they have 
a slightly yellow cast which unless bleached by sun- 
light outdoors, tends to deepen as the film hardens 
and ages, absorbing light and toning the pigments 
beneath. Mural painters frequently resorted to tem- 
pera color in which the pigment is combined with 
white of egg to secure a colorless, water-clear vehicle. 
Or thev worked in fresco, mixing their colors directlv 



Throughout all periods of architecture, color has been the foundation 
of interior decorative treatments. Our Colonial ancestors in Williams- 
burg used it richly for their splendid rooms, often using solid colors nf 
considerable depth. Modernists, too, make color their medium for cre- 
nting the background of beauty j employing it boldly in simple Ttiasscs. 



in the fresh white plaster, in order to avoid any loss 
in color value due to an additional binding material. 
Today anyone can have walls and ceilings true in 
color. For leading mural artists and interior deco- 
rators have discovered that modern water-thinned 
paints employing the newly developed protein- 
base vehicles, combine all the color values of 
tempera and fresco, yet may be applied with greater 
ease and freedom and are exceedins^lv economical. 




^"^ 





THE NEW PRINCIPLE IN PAINT 

The new vehicles which modern chemistry has 
developed have unique and desirable characteristics 
that adapt them particularly to interior decorative 
work. They have properties similar to the substances 
used to make modern safety photographic films 
such as you may use in your movie camera. They 
are also first cousins to the compounds used in the 
manufacture of colored billiard balls. Of a protein 
base, derived from compounds found in certain 
plants and in milk, they are first produced in dry 
powder form. In this state they readily combine 
with water, but when the water evaporates a chem- 
ical change takes place, so that they form a tough, 
clearly transparent film that is thereafter practically 
insoluble in water. 

So in paints made under this new^ principle, the 
pigments are identical with those used in the best 
grades of interior oil paints (lithopones and titan- 
ium oxides). The vehicle in all of these washable, 
water-thinned paints is one or more of these new 
protein-base chemical compounds which become as 



hard and tough as horn after the water evaporates. 
Water is the thinner — the safest, most desirable and 
cheapest thinner nature provides — an utterly safe 
and odorless solvent that dries quickly and leaves 
no trace of its use. 

The resulting paints have properties and advan- 
tages which distinguish them from all other paint 
products: 

PURITY OF COLORS 

Since these modern paint "vehicles" have a crys- 
tal-like transparency and do not acquire color or 
darken with age, they reveal the pure color of the 
pigments which they bind permanently to the wall 
or ceiling. That is why mural artists, architects and 
decorators are choosing modern water-thinned 
paints for mural paintings in railroad stations, ex- 
clusive clubs and great institutions, as well as for 
the finish of interior w^alls and ceiling surfaces in 
many types of buildings. They know their color 
schemes will remain unimpaired by the aging of 
the paint. 



&n,aar,n character to con,pouna. u.s.l to for,,, coUeU bilUard ball. anJ ,„oclern .afety photo- 
<,ra,lncj,l„, te ne. ".A.fe- used in uater^Mnned paints con,lnnes tke ,ual„ies of clear tran.- 
Varencj ana Ion, life. Tkese properties ha,. totH decorative and .tilitaL .alJ^^Z 

TcoUte. R,gM, a ,n„„ern office pa,r,tc„ ,ritk TcMitc for lig>,tir,g efficencj a„,l „lea.„,g col„r 




Ta, 



M 



Gre 



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LIGHT REFLECTION 

All interiors depend for tlieir lighting upon win- 
dows of definitely limited size and placement, or 
upon artificial light from sources even more limited 
in size and brightness. Thus, good lighting first de- 
mands surfaces that diffuse the available light and 
make it reach into distant areas. This quality of 
light diffusion is inherent in modern water-thinned 
paints. For the surface of this new type of paint film 
is microscopically grained and porous. Light strik- 
ing a surface of this nature is scattered, not re- 
flected The result is a glareless, diffusing quality 
that is essential to eye comfort and to the effective 
utilization of light. 

\Vith this characteristic is combined high effi- 
ciency in re -distributing the light received. Labora- 
tory tests show that a modern water-thinned white 
paint will reflect measurably more light than an 
oil-base paint using identical pigments when em- 
ployed for interior purposes, the margin in favor of 
the new type product increasing with age. 

Of course, different colors reflect light in widely 
varying proportions as shown in the table below. It 
is significant that many of the most decorative and 
liveable colors absorb a great deal of light. Hence 
the use of water-thinned paints of modern compo- 
sition is advantageous, because further loss in the 
paint film is substantially less than with oil paints. 



LIGHT REFLECTED BY VARIOUS COLORS 
USED IN DECORATION 



/! 



I 



Light 
Reflected 

White 81-89 

Very pale tints of: 

Gray 75-80 

Tan. 70-77 

Green 66—72 

Blue 57—66 

Yellow to ivory 75 — 81 

Medium tints of: 

Gray 49-59 

Tan 52-60 

Green .,.50—55 

Blue 34—40 

Yellow 65-70 

Strong tints of: 

Gray 30-40 

Tan 30-41 

Green. 35-44 

Blue 21-27 

Yellow .53—58 



%of 
Light 
Reflected 
Solid colors: 

Red 14—20 

Yellow 38—48 

Blue 7— 8 

Green 7 — 10 

Brown 9-11 

Common Wood Fini.-<hes: 

Dark mahogany 7^12 

Walnut 14 — 18 

English oak 15—20 

Light oak 30-35 

Natural pine and 

maple 45—52 

• 
X'alucs based on "Illumina- 
tion Design Data'* General 
Electric Company and other 
sources. 



In practical terms, this means you get more effec- 
tive light for your money in electric bills and better 
distribution of both natural and artificial light when 
you employ modern water-thinned paints. 

QUICK DRYING 

Water is the ideal thinner because it evaporates 
rapidly and leaves no trace of its presence. Rooms 
can be decorated and occupied within a few hours 
after the painter leaves. Two coats can be applied, 
one over the other where necessary, with practically 
no interruption to the painters' work, for by the 
time the first coat is finished the second coat can be 
started. 

This means you can decorate or redecorate in a 
day, or overnight if necessary, without loss of occu- 
pancy- These paints can be used on new dry plaster 
long before oil paints will adhere permanently. 
Speed, economy and quality are gained on every job. 

NO PAINT ODOR, FIRE-SAFE 

Since water is used as a thinner, it eliminates the 
volatile solvents which give the characteristic odor 
to freshly applied oil-base paints. While the fire 
hazard of these volatile solvents for oils is not 
serious except in places that cannot be properly 
ventilated, the use of water as a thinner obviously 
removes any possibility of danger. 





Complete Reflection Difiused Reflection Complete DiBusion 

Surfaces that completely reflect light, like a mirror ^ cause glare and 
harshness and are seldom acceptable in living areas. Diffused reflec- 
tion, such as occurs with gloss enamels and paints are similarly subject 
to glare. Complete diffusion, characteristic of modern water-thinned 
paints and flat interior oil paints give the most complete light distribu- 
tion and increase eye comfort. 




Loss in FUm by Absorption No Loss in Colorless Film 

When a single beam of light reaches the surface film of an oil paint, it is 
partly absorbed by the color of the film itself, both passing through to the 
pigment beneath and returning to the surface. The water-clear trans- 
parency of water-thinned paint films absorbs very little light. Result: 
superior lighting efficiency. 






^^^ 




DURABILITY 

The paint film produced b)- modern water-thinned 
paints has several times the adhesive power of an 
oil film. It hardens with age without developing a 
tendency to chalk, crack or peel. It produces a 
durable paint for interior use on w^alls and ceilings, 
but the film docs not possess the weathering qual- 
ities and resistance to frequent abrasion which 
makes a tough oil-base vehicle desirable for exte- 
rior work and for interior surfaces subject to con- 
stant handling and wear. It is, therefore, recom- 
mended that interior surfaces subject to wear, in- 
cluding the wainscot areas, baseboards, doors and 
window trim be finished in oil paints, enamels, var- 
nishes or stains; while wall and ceiling surfaces, in- 
cluding any decorative moldings above the wain- 
scot level, be painted with water-thinned paints for 
their superior purity of color and light-conserving 
characteristics. 

WASHABILITY 

Walls and ceilings painted wdth these modern 
water-thinned paints are washable after the film has 
matured for several months. They should be washed 
gently, not scrubbed, as the film will temporarily 
soften if thoroughly soaked, and in that state cannot 
stand the abrasive action of scrubbing. But if walls 
and ceilings must be frequently cleaned, as in stores 
and shops where a bright, fresh, colorful effect is 
constantly desired, it is advantageous to alternate a 
washing with complete re-decoration — an econom- 
ical operation that does not interfere with occu- 
pancies when water-thinned paints are employed. 

SUPERIOR DECORATIVE MEDIUM 

The inherent qualities possessed by these new 
principle paints give them their unique advantages 
in many types of decorating work. Providing 
greater purity of color, high light reflection, much 
faster drying without objectionable paint odor, re- 
markable durability, and new economies in cleaning 
and maintenance, they are the logical medium for 
present-day interior decoration. 




STORE CLOSES 530 P. M. 

Quick-drying, odorless, water-lhinned paints are ideal for rediro- 
rating stores, offices and rented space. When customers or ten- 
ants leave for the night or a week-end, the painters move in. 




THAT NIGHT OR NEXT DAY (HOLIDAY) 

Overnight or during a single day, the interior is refreshed and re- 
decorated with ivater4hinned paints. The job is done efficiently, 
economically, qii irkly. 



NEXT BUSINESS DAY 9 A M. 

The .store is itpcnfor business. \o paint odors gnct 
the customers. So urt paint sig/ts warn ''hands ofj"." 






pleamng air of distinction of many tnodern udcrior ireatmerda is 
frequenlhj due to the method in which color is employed m the wall and 
ceiling decoraiion. The restful tone of a pleasant deep pink secured with 
modem water-thinned paints, complemented by a taupe ceiling, con- 
tributes much to the .spirit of this bedroom and tis modem fumishings. 



12 



THE BACKG 




• Success in the decoration of interiors is amazingly 
dependent upon the use of color. Color can bring 
charm where form and proportion are lacking, and 
it can add beauty to the most perfectly proportioned 
and finely furnished interior. 

It is a principle of interior decoration that the 
colors employed in the largest areas — floors, walls 
and ceiling — key the color scheme of the entire 
room. These colors must be liveable colors; those 
that remain pleasing in all moods and to all eyes, 
and because these surfaces, particularly the side 
walls and ceiling are depended upon for light re- 
flection and distribution, they should be chosen with 
regard for their lighting efficiency as well as for 
their decorative appeal. 

That is why modern water-thinned paints are the 
logical choice for interiors where charm, liveability 
and good lighting must be combined. They are the 
decorator's medium for creating that background of 
beauty against which all other furnishings and deco- 
rations take their place in contrast or harmony to 
give the room individuality and distinction. 

RECOMMENDED USES 

Because modern water-thinned paints combine 
the desirable qualities of color purity, high light 
diffusion and distribution, long life and economy, 
they find usefulness in every type of interior in which 
people live, play or work. They are not recom- 
mended for surfaces subject to continual wear and 
abrasion, nor in rooms such as kitchens and baths 
that are frequently subject to excessive humidities 
and condensation on the wall surfaces. For all other 



interior surfaces they are ideal and may be em- 
ployed with complete confidence and satisfaction. 

IN HOMES 

Living rooms, dining rooms, bedrooms, and even 
halls and corridors above wainscot levels, need the 
colorful charm and light reflecting qualities of the 
best grades of modern water-thinned paints. In rec- 
reation rooms, hobby shops, service areas, base- 
ments and attics, various grades may be used either 




iHfi 



for color and tcxtural interest, for good lighting or 
for their economy, ease and speed of application. 

IN RENTED SPACE 

In all types of rented space these paints have com- 
mercial value for their tenant appeal, easy and eco- 
nomical re-decoration, long-term economy and 
freedom from loss of occupancy during the re-deco- 
ration periods. 

Homelike quality is demanded in apartments, 
hotels and clubs, where water-thinned paints should 
be used as in private residences. 

OFFICE SPACE 

Both private and general work areas demand 
good color and superior lighting efficiency. Work- 
ing areas should be pleasant as well as efficient. The 
unlimited color possibilities provided by modern 



water-thinned paints can bring new beauty to any 
office — easily, economically, and with no interrup- 
tion of usual business activities. Lobbies and corri- 
dors above wainscot levels find use for these products 
in colorful mural decorations or attractive tints, 
and for their light diffusing capacity. 

STORES AND SHOPS 

Ideal for all store and shop buildings because 
they avoid shut-downs or loss of business for re- 
decoration, modern water-thinned paints may be 
used in all wall and ceiling areas above the counter 
or wainscot level. With these paints, decorative 
treatment of shops can be changed to accord with 
popular trends or to meet seasonal holiday periods 
which require special treatment. A shop corner or a 
show window can be quickly and economically 
decorated as part of the Christmas holiday scheme, 




14 




Present day merchandising dematids rich and striking 
color treatments in store and shop interiors. Decorative 
schemes similar to the one shown, have paid handsome 
dividends by aiding in attracting new patrons and 
holding old ones. The living room on the opposite 
page is a characteristic example of modern use of color 
in decoration. Several different hues are employed 
to give proportion and scale to large wall masses. 



changed again for the spring styles, or later for a 
new line of summer or autumn goods. 

Profits can be definitely increased through the 
merchandising value of colorful decoration with 
U. S. G. water-thinned paints. 

SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS 

Progressive educators advise the use of color in 
classrooms, auditoriums and study rooms for its psy- 
chological value. Lighting experts recommend 
highly efficient light distribution surfaces for im- 
proved vision. Both are achieved economically with 
modern water-thinned paints. 

The medical profession has found a similar value 
in the use of color in hospital bedrooms, semi-pri- 



vate rooms and wards, for homelike pleasing colors 
aid convalescents in speeding recovery. Water- 
thinned paints may be used in all hospital rooms 
except contagion wards, where very frequent scrub- 
bing and disinfection is required. Washable water 
paints, however, may be disinfected at the time they 
are washed by adding formaldehyde to the water, 
as the latter hardens the paint film. Freedom from 
odors during re-decorating periods is also highly 
important to patients and convalescents. 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES 

For all industrial applications where lighting effi- 
ciency is a pre-requisite, washable water-thinned 
paints in white or very light tints are preferred by 
experts. The great adhesive quality of these modern 
vehicles prevents flaking under excessive vibration. 

Where industrial occupancies create chemical 
fumes of abnormal character, the painting material 
should always be chosen for its resistance to the ele- 
ments present. Technicians of the United States 
Gypsum Company will gladly give performance 
data on U. S. G. paint products under any special- 
ized exposures or service conditions. 



15 



TO THE SELECTION OF 



SURFACE PREPARATION PRODUCTS 



Product 



, USG* SPACKUNG COMPOUND-used for prepar- 
ofory treafment of surfaces before poinHng or 
J decororing, to build up or fill imperfections, 
and to produce a smooth even surface 



. RED TOP* PATCHING PLASTER-a plaster sc\. 

mgji^ entifically compounded for patching cracks in 
walls and ceilings easily and permanently at 
negligible expense. Conveniently packaged. 



^ RED TOP* PWItTBIS PIASTER-Plasler of Paris 

for general painters use. Made from specially 

^ selected white gypsum rock. Packaged in 5, 10 

and 25 pound bogs and in 300 pound barrek 



K-CEMO PRIIIEI*— the answer to the oikali 
fjj/t problem in painting. A priming material which 
-"^ "locks in" lime or alkali and makes possiye 

more durable point jobs. Equalizes "suction." 



Distinguishing 

Characteristics 



Exceptionally fine grind. 
Grit free when dry. Adapt- 
able to knife or brush ap- 
plication. Can be sanded. 
Adheres to any properly 
cleaned solid surface. Sets 
without shrinkage in about 
2 hours. Dries to extreme 
hardness. 



Very white. Non-shnnking. 
Contains no lime. Sets 1 to 
1 ' 2 hours. Uniform set and 
quality. Smooth and plas- 
tic because of special in- 
gredients. 



Mixes readily, works easily, 
but requires more careful 
manipulation than Red Top 
Patching Plaster. Provides 
hard, dense and strong fin- 
ish surfaces. Setting time 
approximately 30 minutes. 



Form 



Sizing 



Takes any stand- 
ard sizing mate- 
rial. 



Uses 



Takes any stand- 
ard sizing mate- 
rial. 



A tasein and Portland cc- 
inrnt formulated primer 
which assures longer life 
for decorative matrriuN 
Produces a hard.limr 1 . f 
ing prime coat over v.1. >, 
may l>r applied oil pi»iuik. 
^^ashablr calcimine, 
rnamcls. casein and water 
t hinncd paints. 



Filling small cracks, scars, slight im- 
perfections in plaster. Making Swedish 
putty. Spotting nail heads. Filling 
holes, ridges, imperfections in con- 
crete. Filling nail holes, knot holes, 
cracks, etc.. in wood trim. Household re 
pairs on moulding, furniture, toys, eti 



For patching cracks ami larger breaks 
in unpainted plaster walla and inter lur 
concrete surfaces. For application hy 
broad knife or trowel. Can be deco 
rated with any decorating material. 



Takes any stand- 
ard sizing mate- 
rial. 



The prelerred aiz- 
ing for surfaces 
lo be painted. 



Recommended for patching crack» 
and breaks in plaster and wherever ■ 
Painters plaster of Pant is used with 
either trowel or broad knife 



For prefxinng these surfaces lor pamt 
ing: Painted and Patched walls and 
ceilings, Plastered surfaces, inter i..i 
concrete surfaces. New or ol' 
liainted concrete floors. Fil>rr, t\ ; - 
and insulating wallbuards. Not ir 
mended for old (>ainted concrete M<>«.i- 
or turfacca which are |>rrmanently «•< 
l<eriodically damp. 



NTERIOR FLAT FINISHES FOR WALLS AND CEILINGS 



TEXOUrr-WHtTE m rWrS-modem water 
HfMB l thinned paint for interior wall and ceiling dec- 
^^^ oration. Provides brighter, more co*Offul interior 

decoration thot is pennonent and inexpemive. 



TEXOUTE* DEEP COLOIS-poim m tme briiom 

colon bringing new, pteosNig color po«UiliM 
J lolhodMoralingonddiiployMd. SimpUond 
e c o i M Mntml la okm^ 



NMCAr (WASIMU aU.CIMKI-««habl. 

oddmifM in powdf (arm pivparwd (or oppli- 



'. Colon Moy bo ' 



I RAL* (MT Wmt 

providM ONO of *o Motf •eononioal «iay« to 
brir<g color into iMoriar doooraaen PtodkosMl 
« aoMtod ooton omI »(rito. 



ISr CM WITEI CALCMK-o prodiool, 

m0VKm, ond coloww low cotf wwk. PonoO' 



Mnrfy podkoged 



Uiirs H 
more ;• 
low. H . 
and ex< - 
due t« 



'♦^rr un1;rr:trvi r<-'!rjr y>o8S; 



Use K-Cemo when 
aizing IS neces- 
sary: nor mail v 



UseK-Crmowhen 
•i/ing IS nrtr* 




.ravtdr pi 



absoi ) t . 



Sim 

• ui f 1 _ . . .. 

fthrlUif CM va/mati 

•ifEC 



Over old and new intrrujr walls and 
crilinKS in home*, hotel*, afHirtmrnto 



.Ji.li. J. <..!.!. I, oru. ui vkhcjc a xkdl U 
subjected to escraaivr abraaioo. 



hired inn 



tktar atsriaoc « 
nrvded. 



Wbavrvcr m hi«ti quality 
calrtauafT witl mr*-l thr »r. 
«# Urn deuiraf v . 



» 




INTERIOR FLAT FINISHES FOR WALLS AND CEILINGS (Conf.) 









Product 



USG* IHTERIOR COLD WATER PAINT-an eeo- 

nomical uHlity paint for renewing and bright- 
ening inferior surfaces. Furnished in white only. 



Distinguishing 
Characteristics 



Starch bound cold water 
paint, below USG Calci- 
mine in quality. Easily ap- 
plied and readily washed 
off when repainting is nec- 
eagary. Best results when 
surfaces are prepared ac- 
cording to good painting 
practice. 



Form 



Sizing 



Uses 



For use in interiors of factories, ware- 
houses, garages, other industrial struc- 
tures, also farm buildings. Excellent 
for coating pipe coverings. More eco- 
nomical than calcimine. 



INTERIOR TEXTURE FINISHES 



rtSO^' 



r^cZZ^^^^^ TEXTONE — a plastic paint meeting the demand 
tcnoNl for a dependable, economical, easily applied 
T texture medium capable of satisfying every re- 

quirement of modern decoration. 



:::>^ USG TEXTURE PAINT*-o lower priced plastic 
rajH,"! paint than Textone, used in the same manner, 
but in applications where the utmost in quality 
of Finish is not a primary essential. 



-. TEXTONE* SEALER-a moderately priced, de- 
sV/iK pendoble sealing agent. While intended for 
t use with Sheetrock* and Textone it may also 

be used with other similar materials. 



TEXTONE* GLAZE-a specially prepared giaz- 
Tm* ME '"^ medium for sized and sealed Textone and 

^"" similar surfaces. Practically colorless. 



First grade plastic paint. 
Textone properly applied 
forms the most permanent 
texture body material avail- 
able. Furnished in white 
only. Can be integrally 
tinted with Tcxolite Deep 
Colors or USG Timeproof 
Colors or applied white 
and color supplied by 
further treatment. 



For same purposes as Tex- 
tone, but provides less cov- 
erage and generally not 
quite so high in quality. 
Can provide excellent tex- 
tures in both period and 
modern styles. 



Water clear after mixing 
and causes no discoloration 
when used over plastic 
paint surfaces. Water re- 
sistive. An effective "suc- 
tion stop" before glazing. 



Dries to a soft sheen. Pro- 
vides durable waterproof 
surfaces. Easily tinted with 
colors ground in oil. When 
tinted blends easily and 
provides ample working 
time. Excellent for multi- 
colored effects. 



Liquid 



Size surface as 
needed. 



Size surface as 
needed. 



Seal surface be- 
fore using. 



As an interior decorative texturing 
n\aterial over any dry, solid, clean 
surface. For new decorating work over 
new plaster, Sheetrock* and other 
gypsum wallboards, and over Wcath- 
erwood* and other insulating wall- 
boards. Especially adapted to refin- 
ishing old cracked plaster surfaces- 
Used to produce stone effects, antique- 
effects and in stencil work 



Same as Textone when highest qu 
IS not demanded. 



For ii/Hnj plastic paints prepuratoiy 
to glazing to prevent "strike m" and 
"bleeding" Used as a protective coal- 
ing over mrrgrally colored plastic 
paints. Excellent for sizing Sheetrock 
and other gypsum wallboards. 



Primarily to produce antique hnishes 
on rough textured wall surfaces, and 
to provide added protection and 
longer life for colored effects on Tex- 
tone and similar treatments. 






EXTERIOR PAINTS 


i 


|^;rir:>^ CEMENTICO*-hydraulic cement base point for 
dMiinNO bringing new beauty, life and color to porous 
1 ^ -"""^ masonry surfaces. 


Made of white Portland 
Cement and other special 
ingredients to produce 
hardness, binding qualities 
and workability. Only 
proved limeproof colors are 
used. Weatherproof. Water 
resistant. Bonds to porous 


Powder 


Applied over 
unpainted sur- 
faces. 


Use only over porous masonry sur- 
faces such as cement stucco, cement, 
cinder block, unglazcd clay tile, con- 
crete, and similar areas. Not recom- 
mended on magnesite stucco surfaces. 
When used over brick follow carefully 
the directions on Page 28. 


f-F=^ USG* EXTERIOR COLD WATER PAINT-an eco- 

Ht?.£ nomical utility paint for periodic painting and 
1 ** J renewal of clean, solid, exterior surfaces. 


Not a whitewash. Casein 
bound paint furnished in 
white only. Easy working. 
Quick drying. Docs not rub 
off. Recoatable. Requires 
addition of water only be- 
fore use. 


Powder 


Usually not 
necessary. 


For periCKlic exterior surface renewal 

of warehouses, factories, fair and expo- 1 

sition buildings, farm buildings, hlling 

stations, stables, fences, etc., and 

other clean solid surfaces from which j 

paint scale, whitewash, and dirt have 

been removed. 

i 


COLORS 


,.C=^ USG* LIMEPROOF COLORS-strong, lighlproof, 

UNHW limeproof colors of great intensity, requiring 
^- only small quantities to secure pleasing tinh. 


With the exception of the 
blue, all the colors are spe 
cifically limeproof. All are 
lightproof. All finel> 
k^round, pure and strong. 
Tinted materials will he 
several shades lighter when 
try than when in the wet 
:nix. 


Powder 


Used for tinting 
only. 


For tinting Textone and other water 
thinned plastic paints, casein paints, 
calcimine, and cement paints. Some- 1 
times used for tinting stuccoa arul 
mortars. Blue is not recommendetl for j 
coloring plasters and mortars. 

•Reg. Trade- Marlci 



PRIX C I 




Colors are 

which rec . ^ 
properties — hue, \\ 



\-ello\v, cj 




a// 



^H 



9 1 


f 




•X'l 






y , 


• 


j 


y 


k' 


j 



oy uie aue circuit 

"""".":. "::*-.-: I' n^ aie hue is placed beiwecn \n^ correspondiiig 

.; idmple hue and the circle is so arranged that 

each hue comes diametrically opposite its com- 
plementary^ hue. Munsell has designated these 
hues b> the s\Tnbols R. RO, O, VO. V. VG. 
G, BG, B, BR R and RP. 

V MunselU a color i io its proper posiiion 

r.\s the scale here 

:cn. The nine steps 

: as "^-alue steps," one to nine. In the Mun> 
nabers and hues b%* s\-nibc^ 



t ,:-ps are iUustrated here in 

:er:rL< of relatiN^e brilliance or purity. 

na steps are established for the 

' - -" \-alue level and num- 

sr ^-ith No. 1 next to 

z outu-ard to the 

h v-ahie lexrL 

.^re a\-ailable 

that ba\^ greater strength than others. 

hence chroma scales are not all of 

equal length. 

With this s\^em the designation R4 8 
sho«%3 that the hue is Blue, the value ts 
4 (''dark blue'*) and the chroma is S 
(cQosderably mncnrd from the gray 
poir). Thus ^T are enabled to describe 
any color io terms of the three propcr- 
<^ the e\T recognizes, and are aided 
.n selrcting colors %«-hicfa %till help 
achie\^ the Kx-able interiors %%t dearc. 



3 * 




HOW TO CREATE COLOR HARMONIES 



' ^ 



Personal tastes govern the use of color in interior 
decoration, and our satisfaction v\ ith color schemt's 
is proportional to the sense of pleasure we experi- 
ence from living with them. Arriving at color com- 
binations that have lasting appeal is made easier by 
an understanding of basic color principles. I se ot 
these principles helps us to secure l)ahuuc ol color 
in our choice of wall, ceiling and floor decoration, 
as well as in our selection of furniture and drapes. 
When Professor Albert 11. Munsell developed ,i 
simple, effective system for ( Lissifying ( olors .k cord- 



ing to the visual sensation they produce, he set up a 
series of numbers and symbols whereby any color 
can be accurately classitied .ind identihed in terms 
of hue, value and chroma. 

The charts on the op[)osite page are based on tlie 
Munsell system. These elunts and Munsell color 
nomenclature explained iii th<-ir related text nia\ he 
used as a basis in arrivm<^ at color harmouKs [no- 
duced b\ tlie use of loiuplementary hues, nemhltor- 
ing hue>, and triads. '1 he i harts are reprodiu ed f)y 
eourtes\ of International Printing Ink ( ca [Xiiation. 



COMPLEMENTARY HIES Complementary color .schemes othT great varieties of color relationshii)S 

kom the stroni^Mst to tl»e weakest contrast, depending on the \ahie aiul 
chroma .idjustment. W lien t ompl<inentar\ c oloi s ate used to^etliei lliey 
have the effect of makmg eacli other more brilliant. 1 his should b<- borne 
in mind in selecting the proper value .ind chroma, because if the same 
value and extreme chroma of each color ar<- used, an unpleasant condi- 
tion of \ibration betwciMi the two (ol.us will occur. 




N E I C. H B (> R I N (. H I ES 




r R I A r> s 




Some of the pleasantest color harmonies are in the urouf) called ''neigh- 
borinu*" or ••analaunue^' color schemes which utili/e a series cjf hues in 
their seciuenee on the c hromatic circle. Two or more hues may be selected 
embracmu ai\ arc cxtendmiz as tar <is two-fifths ol the- way around. We may 
want to use half of the circle, keepmi; withm the warm hues frcjiu red to 
.^M-een or m the cool h.iinrom blur-u'reen to red-purple I'sualK U will \)c 
safer !»> kee[) *'ur selections m .i Mnall«T arc- 



The triad is used in arrivinu: at three-cc;lor eombmatioris The method used 
is to choo.se one color and torm an eciual-sided triam.de to any other two 
colors. This furnishes a «4<>od guide to the reialujnship u( three hues. ... In 
puttini.^ these theories of color harmonies into [)raclice with the piijments 
used in ISC. Texolite, the desi-ner can work with tints, with deep colors 
added to tints, or with intermixtures of deep colors tliemseUes. and thus 
secure an\ desired wall and ceiling color scheme. 



AVAILAB 












TEXOLITE D 


Wrif« Unir«d Sfat«s Gypsum Company, 300 W. Adams St., Chic 
BUFF ^^1^^^^ DEEP GREEN ^^^^^^ 








■ 




■ 


REDUCTION- ^^H 
On«-Quart«r ^^H 
Pint pmr Gallon ^^^ 
of WKi»». 

MEDIUM YELLOW ^ 


^ 


^^m REDUCTION- ^^H 
^^^ On«-Half ^^H 
^F^ p«r Gallon of ^H 

^ Whifo. ^ 

^^ RED ORANGE ^M 


^ 


R 


( 




■ 


L 


^H 




DEDUCT OM;^ 




On«. Quarter ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

p«r ^^^^^^^^^^ Pinf p»r Gollofi ^^^^^^^^^^ 1 
of Whit*. ^^^^^^ of Whit.. ^^^^^^ I 

T«xolif« D*«p Colars also como in Raw S'tmnna, % 



Dl 



EP 



CANARY 



I 



NILE GREEN 





IG ^amf 


^^^H 


USG CALCIMINE LIME PROOF COLORS | 






































IVORY CANARY RAW SIENNA YELLOW J 








^ 


■ 


k 




CREAM 


NILE GREEN 




BURNT SIENNA 




RED 






1 










i 






1 




' 




i: !?;*«*,- s^-^TTiSi^B 






I 














BUFF 


ROSE 




BURNT UMBER 




RAW UMBER 


















1 
















— 


■ 




TAN 


BLUE 




GREEI 


K. 






P~ 
















L 


BROWN 





P COLORS 



for complete color card on any product or products desired. 

LIGHT YELLOW 



BRIGHT RED 



REDUCTION- 

On«-Quarf«r 

Pint per Gallon 

of Whit*. 

DEEP BROWN 



) 




REDUCTION- 

On«-Quart«r 

Pint p«r Gallon 

of WKito. 

»nna. Raw Umber, Burnt Umber, ond Block. 



REDUCTION- 

Ono- Eighth Pint 

por Gallon of 

Whtto. 

DEEP BLUE 



REDUCTION- 

Ono-Quortor 

Pint per Gallon 

of White. 



HOW TO MIX AND BLEND COLORS 



Color is the dominant characteristic of nuxlcrn in- 
terior decoration. The development of USG Texo- 
lite Deep Colors meets the decorator's need for true 
brilliant paint, paint which reproduces faithfully 
decorative schemes conceived by artist and deco- 
rators. 

Unlimited results are possible with Texolite Deep 
Colors used full strength, or reduced with regular 
white Texolite or intermixed with other Texolite 
Deep Colors. (On Page 29 will be found complete 
simple directions for mixing Texolite and Texolite 
Deep Colors.) 




THEORY OF MIXING COLORS -BASIC, SECOND- 
ARY. INTERMEDIATE AND TERTIARY COLORS 
Red, yellow and blue are primary colors. Two of 
these mixed in about equal parts produce a second- 
ary color, such as yellow and blue make green. A 
primary color mixed with an associated secondary 
color make an intermediate color, such as red and 
orange produce a russet. Two secondary colors, 
such as orange and green, produce olive green, a 
tertiary color. 





a 






C 


> 


i 


•5 

S 

q 


K 




u 
r. 


i 


C 


C 
3 


£ 


= 


Light Blue 


Bad 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


(xood 
B 


Good 
B 


Bad 
B 


Bad 
C 


Bad 
C 


Goot 
C 


Bad 


Bad 
C 


Bad 
B 


Good 
B 


Good 
B 




Blue 


(iood 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 
B 


Good 
B 


Good 
B 


Bad 
C 


Bad 
C 


Bad 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 
B 


Good 
B 




(iood 
B 


Light (;re<-n 


Good 

c 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 
B 


Good 
B 


Good 
B 


Gooc 
C 


Good 
C 


Goot 
C 


Good 
C 


(,ood 
B 


(iood 
B 




Good 
B 


Good 
B 


Green 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 
B 


Good 
B 


Good 
B 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


Go.HJ 

B 




Good 
B 


(iood 
B 


Bad 
B 


\-ellovv 


Go<xJ 
B 


Good 
B 


(,()0d 

B 


(iood 
C 


Good 
C 


Good 

c 


(.ood 
C 


(iood 
C 


Bad 
C 


Good 
B 




(iood 
B 


(iood 
B 


Good 
C 


Bad 
C 


Orange 


Good 
B 


(.ood 
B 


Good 
B 


c 


Bad 
C 


(iood 
C 


Bad 
C 


(iood 
B 


Bad 
C 




Good 
B 


Goo<l 
C 


Good 
C 


(io<KJ 
C 


Bad 
C 


Pink 


Bad 
C 


Bad 
C 


Good 
B 


Good 
C 


Good 
B 


.(M< 


Good 
B 


Good 
B 




Bad 
C 


Bad 
C 


(iood 
C 


(iood 
( 


Bad 
(■ 


Ciood 
C 


Red 


Good 
B 


Bad 

c 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


Bad 

c 


Bad 
B 


Goo<l 
B 




(iood 
B 


Good 
B 


(iood 
C 


(iood 
C 


(iood 
( 


Bad 
C 


Bad 
C 


Wineor Maroon 


Good 
B 


G-ood 
C 


Good 
C 


r,ood 

c 


Bad 
B 


Good 
B 




Good 
B 


(iood 
B 


Bad 
C 


( .ood 
C 


(.ood 
C 


Good 
C 


Bad 
C 


Bad 


Purple 


Good 
B 


iood 
C 


Good 
C 


iotxl 
B 


Good 
B 




(iood 
B 


Bad 
B 


(iood 
B 


(iood 
C 


Good 
C 


iood 
C 


Good 

c 


Good 
B 


Bad 
B 


Lavender 


Good 
B 


Good 
C 


Good 
C 


iood 
B 




(iood 
B 


Bad 
B 


Bad 


(iood 
B 


Bad 
C 


Good 
C 


xood 
B 


Good 
B 


iood 
B 


(iood 
B 


Gray 


Bad 
B 


Bad 
B 


Good 
B 




Good 
B 


GtKjd 
B 


(iood Good 

c c 


(iood 
C 


Good 
C 


Ciood 
C 


iood 
B 


iood 
B 


,ood 
B 


GwkI 
B 


Cream 


Good 
B 


Cicjod 
B 




Good 
B 


iood 
C 


Good 

c 


Good 


Gou<3 
C 


( i<JOd 

B 


(iood 
B 


Ciood 
B 


.ood 
C 


Jood 

(" 


>o<xl 
C 


Good 
C 


Tan 


iood 
B 




Good 
B 


Bad 
B 


Good 
C 


:;ood 
c 


Good 
C 


Bad 
C 


Bad 
C 


Good 
B 


ioo<l 
B 


J ood 
C 


:iood ( 
(' 


jood 
G 


ioo<l 
C 


Brown 




Good 
B 


GooiJ 
B 


Bad 
B 


iood 
C 


Good 
B 


tiood 
B 


Good 
B 


Bad 
G 


Good 
B 


B 


^ood( 
C 


Jood( 
( 




Bad 

( 



































COLOR HARMONY 

The chart at left is a han<jy reference 
guide to the selection of pleasing and 
harmonious color combinations. 

In the chart "B" means Blend. Under 
"Good"' it indicates a harmonious com- 
bination of related colors, and under 
"Bad" vice versa. "C" means contrast. 
If under "Good" it indicates a harmoni- 
ous combination of contrasting colors 
and if under *'Bad" vice versa. 

When three colors are used to obtain 
a contrast, a more pleasing effect will 
result if two of these are blends and a 
third is a contrast, than if three con- 
trasting colors arc used. Three blends, 
though, may be combined. In these har- 
monics, the best effect is obtained if one 
color dominates, the second less promi- 
nent, and the third is a subordinate to 
the other two. 



22 



HOW TO USE USG 




aCcl y/?{nncd 

PA 1 X'iS 



• III ^Miiiir.', nut (<) >»(ijir .1 flisniu iivr interior drcorativr 

S<liriiir \\\\\\ I ^( . W.ifri Ihiniirrl f V i i H tl, WC COM klcr lirit ihc 

["' p.ii.iii'Mi ut (li« ,111 1,1' r fu }jr cic-toratrcl and second the finUh- 
III", ii' .iiiiinif 1 1 1. 1 1 \-. ill hr^i nuihlr ii.i tri jirnirr thr dcsirrd rffei't. 

Ill'- iM'ihf.d •)! ,tiil,i(r prf().tr.ition will vary with the base 
li'iM" wi.ik'.! r.ti, htif ill. f.iii, , .iny dcjiirrd trratmrnt can be 
yi MM rl I II till , • -HiiK « I mil 1 1 iH rrromiTirndrd that thr rhi)irr «)f 
stiM.nih IiiiiJk , Im (oiihni-tl to .Hfiioolh ba-HTH, for it is hrrr that 
ili'v < .Ml Im .m Lima •■•I most racily, iiK'cn.ifulty and cconomicalty. 
\\\ thr s.iiiif i(.k« II, wlirn 'A.,i kill ■ over rou^h, cracked pUsleror 
|HH.i vs.iIIIm. ii({ t Mil .11 M< tKMi It I. pnssihir to conceal unnii^htly 
l'lriiii>li< , Mill ,(.iiir [irvv iiitrrmf iMMuty hv ifi'" im«* of texture 
<l< 1 oi.KiMii ,(|,[.li.(l over a properly prrparr«l 

I 111- lnii>li< <l . ||. , I iM l>r I, III. ■ .\ \M II govern the choice of 
iii.it(ii.ik \^ thr .hut on [^l^f■H lo.md 1 7 illu.itrates, prodiicti 
th.it will |.MMhi. r ,1 Minil,!! irnuli havc ditfrrrrifes in character 
ih.tt i.iii .ihrt [Ih- . Ii,ii I. t. I ol' the finished j«)h. Simiiarty the 
(pi.ihtv ol \^olkm.lll^hl[. >r-, lur,! I, Ml 'y'o !•■. ^ important fac- 

I< >l 111 tin. I I I r siih>. t •hl.UIUtl. 

I lu- ImI.iiu r ol (hlH llUIIUUil irll 

I oh.i .,ml t(\(iirr, .mooth and tlippled riniahet, and glajed and 

Ntrm liril ilfuM.ition It irlN how to pi' 

to Im* ilrcor.ittH!. .luU in nelectin^ the ti 

th(n.\|)l.iinsho\v lo |.i oiiucc the denrrd treatment succmftiBy. 






5CORATIVE FINISHES 
PAINTrNG 





ef'- 



w. 



C 



o 








\k 



PREPARATION OF 
GYPSUM WALLBOARD 



PREPARING GYPSUM WALLBOARD 



Instructions given in this section (pages 24 to 27 
inclusive) relate only to the working methods and 
materials required to prepare interior surfaces for 
decorative treatments. This preparatory work varies 
both with the type of surface and with the material 
ultimately to be applied. Finishing treatments in a 
wide variety of attractive types are fully described 
on pages 30 to 38 inclusive, where directions are 
given for producing the desired effect. 

NEW WORK 

When gypsum wallboard is to be utilized in new- 
construction it is recommended that Recessed-Edge 
Sheetrock* and Perf-A-Tape* be used. This type of 
wallboard construction provides a better base for 
decoration. It assures smooth joints free from shadow 
lines. The advantages of this patented type of wall- 
board construction are derived from the fact that 
the long edges of the face side of Recessed-Edge 
Sheetrock are depressed. When boards are erected 
these recessed edges form a shallow channel at the 
joint. Intothis channel special cement is applied and 
Perf-A-Tape is embedded in the cement (see cuts 
below). Then the cement is smoothed off straight 

•R.>K Trade- Marks 



and even with the face of the board. Complete in- 
structions for the application of Perf-A-Tape and 
Perf-A-Tape Jtjint Cement are included with each 
Perf-A-Tape carton. 

After the Sheetrock joints have been treated in 
accordance with these instructions the entire sur- 
face is ready for the further preparatory treatment 
necessary to assure a high quality finished job. 

Choice of finishing treatment governs the type of 
preparatory work as follows: 

LIGHT TEXTURES in white: No further prepara- 
tion necessary. Apply Textone or USC Texture 
Paint as directed on Passes 34 and 36. 
HEAVY TEXTURES in \vhite: Paint Sheetrock or 
other wallboard with a wash coat of the texturing 
material (Textone or USG Texture Paint) made by 
thinning the material to easy brushing consistency. 
This procedure saves both time and material. 
TINTED TEXTONE-To assure uniformity of color 
when tlie coloring matter is incorporated in the 
texturing material (instead of being applied to the 
surface after texturing in white), all joints should 
first be painted with a coat of Tinted Textone in 





1 




PREPARATION OF 

GYPSUM WALLBOARD 



the color initially used, mixed to n^^ular applica- 
tion consistency hut well hrushrd out. When dry 
apply a sizing coat of the same material to the en- 
tire wall. Allow to dry before applyint^ the fin.d tex- 
turing coat of Tinted Textone. 

PREPARATION FOR PAINTING^IUtv again the 
choice of the final finishing materiiil governs the 
preparatory work, as some products are self-priming 
and oth<'rs recjuire a priming eoat. 
USG TEXOLITE OR TEXOLJTE DEEP COLORS- 
Si/e tlie wallboaifls and joints uitli I SC i K-( rmo 
Primer. Follow directions uiveu on the ( odiauKi . 

PAINTING WITH OIL PA/NTS — Si/( with K-( < mo 

to assure best results Irom oil paints in pl.un or 

stipple finishes. 

DURACAL— Ordinarily ref|uires no si/in^, but for 

high<-st (|u,dity Finish si/e the wallboard and joints 

with K-( ^euio. 

KAL OR USG COLD WATER CALCIMINE-Swv the 

Ijoards and jomls with a ^(hkI Mia(l<- of varrush 

sealer or a shellac si/r made of 2-lb. (lit shellac . 



1. FnsI sir I, in Jifushnuf t"'"f^ '" }ir,,.s,.l-K>Ulr Shi,h>ui:. ! h, 
jonit ,s -hutlnnr' tnfh i', >f-.\-'l'n fn Conrnt. 2. A pphi Pnj-A- 
Tniu sinp nuUnd u>rr Ihr ,o/n/. fnnniif <> nn >,l thront/h thr prr- 
Uahrms. 3. Apphf nmrnt nn r I'. ,f-A -I'apf , hnling smfmr and 
J>alhrn,Hf nhjrs tn pmdurr <i smooth h nlj,n,(. 4. Snndpnprr jmnl 
flnsh and Inn to ndjannt surjnns. 5. frrporatton nf ,>ld wnllhoard: 
fust hrush ,ntll rlniN „f dirt and laos, partaUs. 6. Fdl joint ■ 
rrnrl.s witf, (St; Sparkdng Cnm ponnd and sttnd tn .nn,nih Jin> ^ 



OLD WORK 

When an existing Sheetrock or other (i\ p^u^l wall- 
board surface is to be re-decorated, the [)re\ii>us 
decoration or condition of the surface determines 
the pre-[>ar<itory treatment. 

OLD WALLPAPER Nhould be comfylelely remcned 
before re-decor.ilmg witli paint or textures. While 
mod("rn w<iter-thinned paints and eakimine> will 
adhere to most wall [)apers, the paper in.iv be 
loosened or sul)s<(|iirntl\ [X'el. destroNtni; the deio- 
ralivc finish. 

OLD PA/NT should b<- washed i lean of i^reasc with 
lii>o(huiii pliusplialr oi odier sinl.ihic (leainng 
.jt^'ent, and all bll^lers. scahni;, cic, rfiuoved and 
sanded smooth. 

OLD CALCIMINES should be washed off 
GLOSSY SUKf ACESof anv t\pe sfiould \w dulled by 
rubbint^' with steel wool, sandpapt-rirji; or oilier 
treat inent. (ilcjss paints and enamels mav usually 
br diillefl by washini^ vvilh Sal-Soda or other suit- 
.d)|f a<^M'nts. 

ALL OLD SURFACES whether prcviousily undcco- 
ratetl or prepared as al)ov<*, should Ix* hroui^ht to 
a true, smooth surface by hlling nail holes or orackf 
v\ith I S(i S[)a( klinv: (!onj|H)und (for minor de- 
fects); Red lop Patchini,' Plaster (for lari^r areas 
or c r.u ks that can be oprned and undercut to pro- 
vide refjuisite Ixind). 





^ 



PREPARATION OF 

PLASTERED SURFACES 



PREPARING PLASTERED SURFACES FOR REDECORATING 





XEW WORK 

PREPARATION FOR TEXTURED FINISHES 
— \\ lien new pLi>i<T Miiljcrs arr lu rcccixc one (;1 
i\n: UMurc'd finisliinu; irratincnis secured with Tex- 
lone or L'SG Texture Paint (Sec Pa^es 3n tu 31 ) 

UifM- diirttionv vliould he folhjwed: 

Lime Putty, Keenes Cement, Gypsum Trowel Finish, 
Hard Plaster and Sand Float Finishes: 1 hese sur- 
l.itcN sIkmiKI not l>e 'Jexloned or Texture Pointed 
until i\y\ Id the touch. On finishes cont.iininu lime 
alhnv ihiiiv dj\s for drvinij. Prime with K-('eiii(; 
Pi injrr pirjKiicd js lojlows: 

Mixuig K-Cemo. Pl.K r the K-( cmo in a clean 
jiK i.il (onlauier. Add lukewarm water in jiKjpoi- 
licMi (>{ 1 '4 pints to 2' J j)ounds of K-C.enio and stir 
until .1 stiff, smooth p.ivte h ee from lumps is ob- 
tained. Allow to i»land thiiiy minutes, liien stir 
thoroughly, and add slowly with ccjnstant slirrinir 
2 pints more of water. This makes a total of 3^4 
pints of water. Stir until a uniform mi.x is obtained 
and ih<- m.itcri.il is ready for use. 

Application of K-Cemo— K-Cxrmo has a tendency 

to MTlllc, ihc'IcioM ' • f\,.^,.... ...p|J^.j^J^j^ 

This is important. 

Best results are stcuicd hy usin^ a Dutch calci- 
mine type brush. Apply the primer freely, Ix- sure ih..! 
the surface is completely covered uniformly. ( ) 
rough surfaces, the primer should l>e stippled into 
all pits and rough sfxjts to secure thoroutrh coating. 

PREPARATION FOR PAINTING 



• 7^ 



thnlthtyti. 
Imfttrr oil ^ 



fifft^' 



work is to be painted with USG Texolite or Texo- 
lite Deep Colors or with Duracal, Kal or USG 
C^old Water Calcimine remove all dust and sand 
panicles adhering to the surface by scrapino:, sand- 
jKjperins:, ^^nd dusiinu;. 

On both New and Old Plaster Work cut out 
all cracks, holes, and indentations in plaster surface 
and scrape clean. Cracks, holes, and indentations 
must then be wet down and patched unth USG 
Red Top Patching Plaster. After patching plaster 
has dried thoroughly, patches shall be sanded level 
wrth the rest of the surface. ( Al'/IO.V: Do not jUi 
cracks, nail holes, r/. . uifh rfoi/Iar oil pufty. To do so 
will causr oil sfx.ts (<> affair in the ftfiixhai job. 

Fexolite or Texolite Deep Colors ma\ Ik- usedoxer 

jjlasu [ \nIjh1i h.is Ji.iKicned but is not ttujrou^hly 
dr\. ll the plaster is ch \ enout^h to strike a match 
on. i( js dry eiKniuh J(jr application of Texolite or 
'i(\(jh(e Dccjj ( :tiloi V. 

Si/uig. Wljri) il,( linivhm- malerijl is L S( , lexo- 
iiK- <n i.xoliie !>.(]> ( olois ihc piaster shouki Ik* 

M/ed Willi K-( riiKi Pj lliHI . 

\\h< 11 tli< pl.isn r IS !(, br (i.( (Mated witli Dutaial 
ordmauh n(j si/r is jm (cssaiv but where the highest 
(quality finish iv dcMicd, si/e lust with K-Cx-niu. 
NVhere /.^/or f SC Cold Watn CuLnnifif is used the 
. lasier should !><• si/ed with a food tuade of \arnish 
sealer or a 2-p(-un(l ( ut sIh ll.n 

OIT) WORK 

In jirrparing Old Master Work f(ir either Texturing 

or I'ainiing wallpa{>er must lie removed. Remove 

all dust, loose dirt, or scaling material adhering to 

the surface. All calcimine or water paints must lje 

r<*mo\ed by cashing. After this cracks, holes and 

'dentations should Ix- treated in accordance %irith 

'C Ujld-face paragraph alxjve. Surfaces which 

ave not Ijeen previously decorated should be 

' d after which the prcjcedure will Ije the same 

i new work. 



ll 

I 



PREPARATION OF 
OTHER SURFACES 



PAINTED SURFACES, FIBER WALLBOARDS, WOOD & METAL 



PAINTED AND ENAMELED SURFACES— GLOSS OIL 
AND VARNISH SURFACES— X'cry few painted, enam- 
eled, or varnished surfaces are in condition for redecoration 
without a treatment to remove all dust, dirt, grease, or soft 
scaling paint. Glossy surfaces must have the gloss thoroughly 
dulled. The following treatment is recommended. 

Use an alkaline paint cleaner, such as trisodium phos- 
phate or similar material, following the manufacturer's 
directions. Scrape with scraper to reinove paint loosened by 
the above treatment. Cleaner, soap, etc., should be thor- 
oughly rinsed off with clear water and the wall dried. 

Treat the under surface as specified in its classification in 
this book. 

WAXED SUKFACES— All traces of wax must be completely 
removed. Decorators frequently resort to a mixture of equal 
parts of naphtha and carbon tetra chloride to accomplish 
this. The surface should then be sized, as recommended for 
plaster surfaces. 

CALCIMINED SURFACES — Thoroughly wash off the 
calcimine so no color remains on the surface, especially 
around trim and in corners. Size if necessary, 

WALLPAPER— All wallpaper must be thoroughly removed. 
When the wallpaper has been removed, wash the surface 
with a solution of sal-soda and hot water. Treat the under 
surface as specified in its classification in this book. 

INSULATING BOARD AND HARD PRESSED 
BOARDS— Remove all loose dust and dirt adhering to the 
surface . . . Ordinarily no prime coat is necessary before 
applying Texolite . . . However, boards made of cooked pine 
fiber sometimes will cause bleeding into the first coat of 
paint and in such case prime the surface with one coat ot 
pigmented oil primer. 

When finishing with Duracal proceed as with Texolite. 

When finishing with Kal or USG Cold Water Calcimine 
the board should be sized with a good grade of varnish 
sealer or a 2-lb. cut shellac and a second size coat applied 
when necessary. 

FIBER WALLBOARD^ Remove all loose dust and dirt 
adhering to the surface . . . Ordinarily no prime coat is 
necessary before applying Te.xolite. However, when fiber 
wallboard is used for finished panel work prime the surface 
with one coat of pigmented oil primer . . - When finishing 
with Duracal proceed as with Texolite . . - W^hen finishing 



with Kal or USG Cold Water Calcimine the board should 
be sized with a good grade of varnish or a 2-lb. cut shellac 
and a second size coat applied when necessary. 

Insulating Boards and Fiber Wallboards may be deco- 
rated with Textone or L'SG Texture Paint if they are first 
sized in accordance with the instructions provided by the 
board manufacturer. 

WOOD SURFACES — Wood surfaces are presumed to be 
clean and sanded smooth, free from surface defects, and in 
suitable condition for priming . . . Remove all loose dust and 
dirt adhering to the surface . . . Coat all knots or pitch 
streaks with white shellac to which has been added a little 
pumice or whiting . . . When using Te.xolite over wood fin- 
ish prime the surface with one coat of pigmented oil primer 
. . . W^hen using Texolite in mill or factory painting, spot all 
knots and pitch streaks with pigmented white shellac. Ordi- 
narily in such interiors no further priming is needed. 

When finishing with Duracal proceed as with Texolite. 

When finishing with Kal or L'SG cold water calcimine 
the surface should be sized with a good tirade of varnish or 
a 2-lb. cut shellac. 

Wood surfaces to be Textoned or L'SG Texture Pcunted 
should be sized with a priming coat of pigmented shellac or 
varnish size and the texturing material applied direct. 

METAL SURFACES^ Sntv: VvUnc appl\int,' Icxuiitc all 
metal surfaces must be primctl with oil paint. On black iron 
or steel in damp location, red lead or other rust inhibitive 

primer should be n.'^rd. 

.\fw Work — Remove all dirt, grease, and rust spots with 
benzine. L'se sandpaper or a wire brush if nccessar\ . . . CJal- 
vanizcd work should be thoroughlv washed with acetic acid. 

Old Work — Remo\e dirt and grease by washing thoroughly 
with benzine . . . Xote on Priming Xew and Old Metal Sur- 
faces: Factory prime coat on metal is often scratched or 
chipped in shipment and erection allowing rust spots to 
develop. In these instances prime the surface with one coat 
of pigmented oil primer. 

When finishing with Duracal proceed as with Texolite. 

When finishins^ with Kal or USG Cold Water Calcimine 
the surface should be sized with a good ^rade of \arnish or 
2-lb cut shellac. 

Metal surfaces to be finished with Textone or USG Tex- 
ture Paint should be sized with a varnish size to which a 
little of the texturing material has been added to give tooth. 



27 



^^m 

DECORATION OF 
EXTERIOR MASONRY 




WITH USG CEMENTICO 
ON POROUS MASONRY 



• Cementico is a cold-uater, weather-proof, insoluble 
hydraulic cement paint used to bring beautv, life and 
color to unpainted masonry, indoors or out. It is a drv 
powder that is prepared by mixing with water on the job. 
Cementico comes in ten colors and white. Colored pi"-- 
ments are limeproof, assuring brilliance and long life. 
In addition to the ten regular colors, other shades can be 
obtained by tinting white Cementico \vith USG Lime- 
proof colors. 

TYPES OF SURFACES— As Cementico is a cement- 
base paint its proper application is limited to porous 
masonry surfaces, such as unglazed and unpainted brick 
and clay tile, Portland cement stucco, concrete and un- 
polished building stones. It should not be applied to 
wood, to any painted or greasy surface, nor to non-porous 
materials such as smooth plaster, terra cotta or enameled 
brick. It is not suitable for floors of anv ivpe. 

Masonry subject to efflorescence should not be painted 
with any material until the cause of the efflorescence 
is completely eliminated, as the formation of these salt 
crystals exerts a pressure no paint can withstand. New 
brickwork or other masonry should therefore be allow cd 
to weather for a period before painting with Cementico, 
to ascertain if efflorescence w ill de\elop. 

PREPARATION OF SURFACE-Brush all loose dirt 
and dust from the surface. Remove all oil and grease bv 
washin<x \vith a l-per-cent solution of muriatic acid and 
water; rinse thoroughly with clear water. Wash off 
whitewash or calcimine with water. Thoroughly clean 
old smoked brick. Be sure all traces of dust are removed. 
Before painting, all cracks should be carefully filled, col- 



ored to match old surface and allowed to dry thoroughly; 
a hea\-y mix of Cementico will usually ser\-e for this pur- 
pose. New cement stucco should be allowed to season for 
at least five days before Cementico is applied. All lime 
bloom or efflorescence must be removed with a 5-or 
10-per-cent solution of muriatic acid, followed by a thor- 
ough washing with clean water. 

Before application to previously oil painted areas, all 
traces of paint must be removed in order to produce a 
truly porous surface. This can best be accomplished by 
sand blasting. 

Cementico should be applied to a damp surface for 
satisfactory results. In dry weather or on dry surfaces wet 
thoroughly with water just before painting to equalize 
suction and supply the water necessary for the proper 
setting of paint. In dry climates or in extremely dry 
weather the walls should be lightly sprayed with more 
water after the Cementico has started to dry. 

DIRECTIONS FOR MJXING-Use a clean galva- 
nized or tin mixing pail. For normal conditions approxi- 
mately two and one-half quarts of clean, cool water will 
be required for each five pounds of Cementico. (Be sure 
to maintain this ratio when working with larger mixes.) 
In mixing, first add two quarts of water (for each five 
pounds of Cementico to be mixed) to the mixing vessel 
and gradually stir Cementico into water making a thick 
paste. Allow mix to stand 30 minutes, then bring to work- 
mg consistency by adding the remaining one-half quart 
of water (for each five pounds of Cementico mixed). 
This is normal working consistency and the paint is now 
ready to apply. However, conditions of surface and ap- 
plication may vary somewhat, making it necessary to use 



28 



tfte. 



DECORATION OF 
EXTERIOR MASONRY 



slightly more or less water than prescribed. Do noi mix 
more Cemcntico than can be appHed in one-half day. 
Do not change to a new batch in the middle of a wall. 
W^hite may be added to colors to produce li^ihter tints or 
colors may be intermixed. 

DIRECTIONS FOR APPLYING— Cemcntico may 
be applied with a brush — a Dutch calcimine brush does 
very well — or it may be sprayed on with any standard 
spraying equipment. 

One coat of Cemcntico is usually enough; however, 
white and light tints frequently have to be applied in 
two coats to obtain perfect covering. Avoid laps so far 
as possible, because Cemcntico dries out lighter where 
lapped. To get good looking jobs, stop work at corners 
and angles only. 

In extremely dry weather, spray the Cemcntico lightly 
after it has started to dry. In order that Cemcntico may 
attain its full hardness, moisture is necessary; otherwise 
a "dry out" results. When moisture is not present, it must 
be supplied. Do not apply Cemcntico during freezing 
weather, when it is likely to freeze before it has set, or 
during prolonged wet spells. 

Several weeks of time are required for Cemcntico 
to attain its full hardness, so do not be alarmed at the 
little dusting that appears on the surface after application. 
Brushes and buckets must be cleaned at the end of the 
day. When using a spray gun, be sure to wash out the 
hose and the gun thoroughly with water before putting 
it away. 

COVERING CAPACITY — One pound of Cemcntico 
applied in one coat, will cover 16 to 25 square feet, de- 
pending upon the roughness of the texture and the heavi- 
ness of the application. 

CAUTION: Keep Cemcntico containers tightly closed 
because exposure to moisture is detrimental to the mate- 
rial. Avoid using brushes with fine white or bleached 



bristles — coarse black bristle brushes give best results. 
Do not let brushes stand in paint. When not in use, 
brushes should be washed clean. After washing, brushes 
should be rinsed in a vinegar solution, for full protection. 

WITH USG EXTERIOR 
COLD WATER PAINT — 
PERIODICALLY RENEWED 

USG Exterior Cold Water Paint (furnished in w hiie oiil\ ) 
is designed for use wherever periodic repainting and re- 
newal is necessary on exterior surfaces of wood, brick, 
stucco, metal, or other clean, solid surfaces. 

It has proved its economy and service for warehouses, 
factories, fair and exposition buildings, farm buildings, 
filling stations, stables, fences, etc., and other similar 
work requiring an attractive renewal. 

USG Cold Water Exterior Paint will reiinish any 
clean solid outside surface. All paint scale, wliitewash 
and dirt, must be removed before p.iinting with USG 
Exterior Cold Water Paint. 

EASY TO MIX — .\dd water (not too cold approxi- 
mately 70 degrees is right temperature) to powder in 
proportion of 3 pints of water to 5 pounds of i)owder for 
average conditions. 

Mix to form a stiff p.istc, niixtuic iuusl In- ihoioughlv 
stirred until it is free from lumps. Then thin with water 
to a creamy consistency. 

If paint is to be applied with a spray gun the mixture 
should be strained through two layers of cheesecloth to 
remove lumps or any foreign material that may have 
been mixed in. 

USG Cold Water Exterior Paint will cover a[)i)roxi- 
mately 50 to 60 square feet per pound of powder. It is 
packed in 25 pound containers, 100 pound drums and 
325 pound, net weight, barrelv. 



Brilliant white or aoft padtl tint^ uj color 
add to the beauty of stucco, concrete an^l 
other types of masonry titnictures. In 
areas blessal icith brilliant ifunlight drah 
color lack!> vitality: in d idler climates 
bright walls add cheer. For enduring ex- 
terior painting on porous wasonry ( <- 
mentico should be used. For hiuhlings 
such as fair grounds, exhibition strut- 
tares, recreational parks and temporary 
buildings of any type where periodical 
repainting is expected, VSG Extcritu- 
Cold Water Pamt is sudable. 




f 


\ 1 




i,! 








f 





% 






Color combined with texture adda greatly to 
the interest of the walls in this modern office. 
Such effects may he secured ea^dhj and 
economically with Textone and Texolite. 




SECURED WITH USG PAINT PRODUCTS 



Two basic types of attractive interior linishing 
treatments may be secured with L'SCr Paint 
Products. These two types arc the Smooth or 
Stippled Painted Finishes described and ilhis- 
trated on Page 31 to 33 inclusive; and the 
Textured Finishes shown on Pages 34 to 38. 
Any one of these finishing treatments in.i\ br 
achieved successfully by follouinir tin- dirfc- 
tion^ Iru Inrlrrl vyj^h thf devfri pijc jii . 



30 



PAINTED FINISHES 
SMOOTH OR STIPPLED 

TEXOLITE AND TEXOLITE DEEP COLOR 

MIXING— To reduce Texolite paste, slowly add one part water 
to two parts paste. For best results, water should be not less 
than 70° F. If about one-eighth of total water content is added 
first and stirred to even consistency, mixing is made easier. 
Balance of water should then be added gradually in small 
quantities with thorough stirring. In cold weather slightly 
more water may be needed and in hot weather slightly less. 
After reduction, strain paint through a fine cheesecloth before 
using. It will then be ready for immediate use. Mixed Texolite 
should be used within one week. If it is not used at once keep 
the mix covered with a damp cloth. Always use galvanized 
containers for mixed material — ncNcr mix in a wooden bucket. 
Store Texolite in rooms of moderate temperature. In winter 
protect Texolite from freezing. 

FOR TINTING WHITE OR INTERMIXING COLORS -To 

the thick smooth paste (after one-eighth water addition men- 
tioned above) add necessary quantity of Texolite Deep Color 
similarly prepared to equal consistency. Stir in thoroughly for 
even distribution of color. Then reduce tinted paste to appli- 
cation consistency by gradually stirring in balance of water. 
Always strain through fine cheesecloth to prevent possibility of 
color streaks. Caution: when tintint^, inter-mix ()iil\ pastes ot 
equal consistcnicies. 

APPLICATION~M lexolite is a quick-dr\ ing paint, always 
work to a wet edge to avoid laps. Avoid drafts during applica- 
tion but be sure to provide ventilation after surface is pamtcd, 
particularly during damp weather and in unoccupied rooms. 
Pro\idc heat in cold weather. 



DECORATIVE FINISHES 
PArNTING 




Ma ft If charming color combinaiicnis 
are possible with Texolite tints 






Contrast th e .s m ooth //a inivii ji n inh c.s 
above with the sti ppkd effects below 




Stipples like these are made with two colors 
of Texolite blended with a stippling brush 



31 




DECORATIVE FINISHES 
PAINTING 



r 



COVERING CAPACITY-Onv gallon of rrduccd 
paste will spread approximately 300 to 800 
square feet depending on surface and method 
of application. It may be applied with either 
brush (jr atomizing power spray gun. A IJuleh 
calcimine brush j)ro\iclcs ease and speed (jf 
application. 

1)1 K \( AL (WASHABLi; ( AIX IMIXF) 

MIXING— L'sc only (lean nn-ial mixing ]>ails. 
lor cat h live pounds of Duracal pour four 
pints of lukewarm water InUi mixing Ijuckel. 
add Oh* Duracal and stir thoroughly until free 
ol hmi[js. Let mix stand thirty miniUes ;md 
tlicii stir well. I hin lo p.jintinu ( onsistcn( \ l)\ 
tlic iiddition ol cHic-hall lo one j>int of water. 
Do not use more than hvc pints (jf waiter to 
ra( li fi\c [>ounds of 1 )ui <i( .i!. 

Best results arc alw.iv s (il>t<iin((l |>\ slr.nninn 
mix throuLdi ( heevet Ifjlli be!(ji( .ipplviiiL'. 

TINTING— l)ui,ii ,i\ (.HI lie litrled to an\ de- 
"^ired ^h.ide or dee[> ( olor witli lexohte Deejj 
(^olor P.isie. Paste vhtjiild l>e thiiuied b\ add- 
ing OIK- pai t water to two (j.n ts paste. Stir into 
Dura( .il luitil desired vh;ide is developed. 

l*S(; Ijiueproot Di \ ( oloiv nia\ also |><- 
used lor tinting lo produce lii^ht sh.ides. \oi 
luoic than 5% LimejiKMjf Color by weight 
should be added to Duracal. A ^^reater (juan- 
tiiv m.i\ }>rodu(e unsatisf.K ior\ results. L Sd 
Ijineproof ( olors should be broken ficiwn s<-p- 
arately in water and added to the mixed 
Duracal lx*fore thinning (o application con- 
sistency. If it is nrcrssar\' to tint additional 



matei'ial Kj finish work started always have 
enough of the wet paint to use as a standard 
with which to compare the next batch. It is 
easier to match wet samples. 

APPLICATION- Duracal should be applied 
with a regular or Dutch calcimine brush. It 
ina\- also be ai)pli(xl by spia) . 

When applying, Duracal should be flowed 
on in a smooth even coat. Do not attempt to 
brush out loo thin. Always work lo a wet edge 
and avoid drafts during application. (;ood 
\<"ruilation after application will hasten dry- 
ing. During cxtreniely hot weather- or over 
\er\ por(}Us surfaces belter- results ma\ be had 
b\ substituting ^2 pint boiled linseed oil for 
^.mie amoirnt of water in thiiming mix. 

COVERING CAPACITY-lnv pciundsof Dura- 

<;il wilJ (o\ei. one coal, 20f» to 300 square feet 
over primed or p.iiiiled surfaces. Rough or- 
Jjoious sill f.Kev \\ ill 1,(. less. 

KAL 

M«f 1<^ J-l IM H' )l W \I IK ( \[ ( l\tl\l 
MIXING— l\c boiling water in prcjporlion of 
four |>ir)ts of water to five pounds of Kal. Poui 
water into ( learj rneial ( ontainer and then add 
Kal lo the water, siirring until well mixed. 
Allow th<' mixture to stand for ihirty miir- 
utes and add oih pirjt (;f ( old water Cor suffi- 
cient U) make c (jusistcnc v like thick cream). 
Sirain tfrrough cheesrclotfi immediately and 
allcm to stand until it has jelled. Kal is then 
ready for application. 

NOTE: In hot, Jiuinid weather, sirain and 



32 



^^ 



w 



DECORATIVE FINISHES 
PAINTING 



apply Kal while still w arm, using four pints of 
water to five pounds of Kal. 

MIXING — Kal may be tinted lo any desired 
shade with Texolite Deep Colors. Deep C'olor 
Paste should first be thinned by adding one 
part water to two parts paste. This thinned 
Deep Color is then stirred into the mixed Kal 
until the desired shade is developed. 

Other shades can also be obtained by mixing^ 
together two or more regular Kal colors. To 
lighten any regular Kal color simply add white 
Kal. No special "tinting" white is needed. 

APPLICATION -Keep plenty of Kal on the 
brush. Flow^ on freely and do not brush out too 
thin. Avoid drafts in rooms while painting. 
Work to \vet edges to avoid lapping. Stop work 
only at corners or angles. After finishing a 
room with Kal, provide ample ventiladon for 
thorough drying. 

USG C OLD WATER CiALClMINE 

MIXING-Use cold tap water in proportion of 
approximately three and one-half pints ot 
\vater to five pounds of USG Cold Water 
Calcimine. Pour water into clean metal con- 
tainer and then add calcimine to the water. 
Stir the mix until a thin creamy consistency 
is obtained. In ^varm humid weather the mix 
should be a little thicker. Strain through cheese- 
cloth immediately. USG Cbld Water Cal- 
cimine is then ready for application. 

NOTE: If the mix stands for some time it will 
jell or thicken. Stirring will usually return it 



to proper c(jnsistency. If not, add a little water. 

TINTING -USG Cold Water Calcimine may 
be tinted to any desired shade with Texolite 
Deep Colors. Deep Color Paste should first be 
thinned by adding one part \vater to two parts 
paste. This thinned Deep C'olor is then stirred 
into the mixed calcimine imtil the desired 
shade is developed. A definite advantage of 
tinting with Texolite Deep C'olors is that the 
deepest of shades can be obtained \\ilhout th(^ 
necessity of adding glue. 

Other shades can also be obtained b\- mix- 
ing together two or more regular USG Cold 
Water Calcimine colors. 

To lighten any regular color simply add 
white USG Cold Water Calcimine. 

APPLICATION— Vnllaw instructions for ap- 
plying Kal. 

USG INTERIOR COLD WATER FAINT 

PREPARATION— Surface to be painted must 
be clean, dry and firm. Loose dirt and scales 
must be remoxed. 

HOW TO MIX: Add suihcient water (nut too 
cold— 70 degrees is about right) to tiie dry 
poxsder to form a stiff paste. Stir until the mass 
is free from lumps and then thin to a creamy 
consistenc\-. Two and one-half pints of water 
to five pounds of powder is the proper propor- 
tion for a\'erage conditions. If a[)plication is to 
be with a spray, the mixed paint should b(* 
strained through two layers of cheesecloth to 
remove lumps or foreign matter. 



33 



DECORATIVE FINISHES 

TEXTURING 



/.I 



i\i 





AND HOW 



«• 




• LeadiJii,^ dceuraiors rccogiiizr ihc icxturud .suiIjic a> one ul I Ik- most vtWx- 
live forms of wall dccoraiion. They advise the use of textures for interiors where 
ihe utmost in individuality and good taste is wanted. Tliey employ textures 
also because they provide attractive relief to wall surfaces otherwise flat and 
uninteresting. And tliey recommend textures for moderni/.iiion work because 
they are unequaled in concealing wall blemishes. 

The illustrations here show how easily and with wh.K simple i<m»1s iIum- ^u■^v 
textures may be secured with Jextone or I'SC; 'Jexmre Pjin- 

MIXING TEXTONE — Texlone should be mixed in metal pails of ample si/( 
Mix the dry powdered Texlone into water in the proj)ortion of about 3 gallons 
of water to 25 jxjunds of Textone. When it is desired to secure the exiremeh' 
fine textures 4K gallons of water may be used to 2^ pounds of lextone. Best 
results arc obtained by mixing Text(jne into slii^dilly Irss water than required, 
thoroughly stirring, and then addintr balance ^){ water. Let mixture soak 30 
minutes before appKiu-. If ih<- w.iir, is \, rs (old a lonL'<-r .soaking time is 
required. 

It is best to mix only enoni;h Ujr one da\'s use, but il any is leii o\ci k;n, i 
with a little clean water; Ix-fore usiny the next d,i\ siir in suHicient fresh 
Texlone to take up this addition. d w.uer . Do not attempi ,,. mm- 'lextone ih.t 



'^^ 



# 



\U d*nnatiu tiiaitiu ntn f^hutin on 
tl'tM jMjgt: art- ftrtrnJuml vu(h htm pit 
atiirUif ftniud in moid htuMhtiii'. 
Ftrst Oft/tly TrrtoTir vith a brimh. 

1 . SttuHtth lioft Tertitm: viUi jtalm of 
txiTid^ then vith jMi^fiing tnnjel. 
. \ piAy tdefu-tl (u tletuTi Ited tm jtagt .i7 . 

2. Vtriical tdn/tea via4ie frre hind 
th ffnall Wire brush. S. PaiUm 

i uuth tUfi'l amih of the type 

ti caring fur dtjga. 4. \ i-ritcal 

tdiiptu f'imuA hij drairtng a jmre of 

lin^ u'htrh han an irregularly cut 

tdge, oi<trr the nurnd Texitme. f . SleU' 



TO PRODUCE THEM 



DECORATIVE FiNISHES 
TEXTURING 



t ^'A 




lias stood 48 hours in the luixi'd ttjiiduiuii iinlr^.s .iiJpMixiiiMU'ly 30 prr (cnt 
fresh dry material is added to the batch. 

APPLYING TEXTONE— To apply Tcxtonc, use any clean brush ((tiost 
cconuinical results are secured by the use of Dutch or Baby Dutcli calcinune 
brush). Brush Textonc out evenly over llie surface. (Tliickness of ci[]pli( atuHi 
depends on the type of texture desired— it will be well to experiment (hi a 
small area to determine the pro[)er thieknesv; ) The texture can then be worked 
in as desired. 

Some of the tools that may be used to uork in textures are as follows: block 
stippler for a sand float stipi)led eflect; Dutch brush for l.n -e brush textures or 
swirls; spont^^e for sponge stipples, swirls, etc.; crumpled paper, fint^^er tips, 

palm of the hand, and other liandy tools m.iy be used to pnuhice otlin ..ffrac- 

tive textures, as indicated in the illustrations. 

CAUTION— As hardened Textone is insoluble in vx.Uer, do not In spatters 

stay and harden on woodwork or trim. Wash them olf uiih a sponge and uater. 

Keep pails, tools, and brushes clean. Do not let lextone harden on them. 
Moderate temperatures should prevail in the room. While applvin-, closi- 

doors and windows to avoid drafts, openin- them aher application to p<Tmit 

free circulation of air. Provide heat in ctiUl weather. 





^'d capitals (scv page S:). Form 
(^olumiiH by (t raid rig a piece ofcomi- 
gated cardboard iTrtically over soft 
•surface. 6. Smooth wet Textone unth 
P^lfn of hand. Form broad alnpes 
h dratring whiskbroom verticalb/ 
'Joirn xcalls. A'arrow stripett are 
"mde icith blade of serine driver. 
^* Apply Textone irith whiskbrootn 
fhrough cixirfie wire meah. Stenctt 
border design, t. Apply Text&ne 
^'^dh brush; stipple by fxitting u^ith 
Mtn of hand. Stciiril figures as 
^('icrihedon iKige 37 . 



•III f' V 














DECORATIVE FINISHES 

TEXTURING 



TEXTONE FOR TEXTURE— TEXOLITE FOR 
COLOR" — Probably the most effective and eco- 
nomical method of securing colored textured deco- 
ration is by the use of Texolite over Textone. With 
this method as soon as the textured Textone surface 
has dried thoroughly Texolite can be applied. It 
may be advisable in some cases to add slightly more 
water to Texolite when usino; it over textured sur- 
faces. 

OTHER METHODS OF COLORING TEXTONE. 

'Jlicre are several otlier incihods of coloring Tex- 
tone. A one-coat color effect is obtained by mixini,^ 
USG Limeproof Colors with a small amount oi 
water, and adding this color lo mixed Textone uniil 
the desired tint is obtained. 

Two-toned color effects may be obtained by lim- 
ing Textone Sealer with dry limeproof colors, and 
apjjlying tinted Sealer to the Textone surface. Then 
this surface is wiped with a cloth to produce high- 
lights. One or more colors may be used by mixing 



For a rooTii rrhirh nmls the fu ightf niTig (ffict jfroiluccd by ririical 
slrij)<.< Ifus (i/fn nf lr(<i(rfi( ftt hn^ nil tin color intcnst of an expeitsivc 
irtill jidjH r trith the riclmiss of artutil fiiturt . Tlx (fall is ])rf }>nri<i as 
for <l4>i(j/i f'> on (he prtmlittg /xujt {iisinfj vhi.^k hroo/ti ami .■<rrtw- 
({rirtr). J'Ik rolor i.< 'ftiohtt junntcl in hroad fm Imrui stripes. 



each color in a separate container and blending the 
several colors on the wall. 

Still other methods of coloring textured surfaces 
include the application of colored sands. Texsand 
(a special sand which can be tinted to any shade 
with dry color) may be blown on the wall. Green- 
spar (a natural sand of greenish color) is used in 
producing Travertine stone effects. 

The use of tinted Textone Glaze is another way 
in which a colored texture surface may be secured. 
This method is described on Page 38. 

TEXTURED FINISHES WITH USG TEX- 
TURE PAINT— Where the highest quality tex- 
ture finish is not desired, USG Texture Paint pro- 
\ ides an effective medium. 

MIXING— USG Texture Paint should always be 
mixed in proi)ortions complying with the instruc- 
tions included \sith the container. After standing 
30 minutes, give final stirring and then appK . If 
vsaier is very cold, a longer time is required. 

1 1 is best to mix only enough for 
(jnc day's use but if any is left over, 
cover with a little clean water and 
before using the next day, slir in 
sufficient fresh Texture Paint to 
lake up this additional water. 

As hardened Texture Paint is 
insolubU" in water, do not let splat- 
ters harden on woodwork or trim. 
Do not let Texture Paint harden 
on p;iils. itjols or brusiies, 

APPLICATION; Use clean brush, 
laving the p;ijiit on to a uniform 
lhi( kness acccnding Uj ilie type of 
icxiurc desired. The texture can 
then be worked as desired. Mod- 
ri.itc temperatures must prevail in 
the roofn. Avoid drafts while work- 
iiJL' - then \<nlilate tlie ro(Mn well 
U) drv . 

COLORING: lexolite is particu- 
larly \Nell adapted for coloring Tex- 
ture Paint. In all color work with 
this product the directions included 
viith the package Khould \)c follov\fd. 




DECORATIVE FINISHES 

STENCILING 



1. hitur tht ({f Sired design on oilt<l 
'<Unnl iKiper. Designs such as those at 
the right may be enlarged and tracefl. 

2. Cut stencil with razor-keen knife 
"« a piece of glass. Pattern must have 
"f^N to hold all parts together. 

3. Stencil may be used for painted dec- 
<>ration,for relief work with TexUme, 
^rfor ap^dtjing color to relief designs. 



MODERN 




DECORATIVE TREATMENTS 



• Distinctive, economic. il th . .-i .ni'u. i>, set urtd hy in«.u.> «-. 
Textonc applied throui^li >iriu il>. 

In treatments where an exact and constant rt[)<uu<)ii ol 
pattern is desired the stencil is the pr.ictical means. 

However, in the best practice such ornamentation is subordi- 
nated to the architectural features of the wall treatment and 
docs not C(jnipete lor .ittciuion. 

STENCILS — Ordinary oiled pap<r stencils are used for relief 
(jMiainent in Texlone. Special stencil desii^ns may be made from 
regular oiled steiK il pj[)er. The desii^n is first carefully drawn 
<m the p-iper and is then cut with <> sharp pointed knife by lay- 
inij it on a piece of plass. 1 he hni>h<(i stencil should be given 
two (oats of brushing Licc(U<r or shellac betore use. 

Some decorators prefer to us<- thin metal stencils. 'I hese are 
more durable than the pap<-r type. Hi^her relief is obtained bv 
the use of stencils cut from heavy linoleum. All stencils must be 
kept ( lean bv uashni^ ihein immediately after use in Trxtone. 
APPLICATION — 1 ht i«\mnd surface on which the orna- 
ment is to be a|)pli<(l n>n>t be thoroughly dry and should b.- 
sandpapered enouuh to permit stencil to lie flat. Do not attempt 
to apply lexlone ornament over a ^dazed textured surface. 
I he Textone for stetu ilini; should be mixed to a thick mud- 
like consistency and applied over the stencil with a four-inch 
sciaper knife. The lextone is Imtterrd or pressed hruily and 
evenly in a thick, he.i\v coal over the stencil, which is then 
carefully removed, thus leaving the design in bold, hii<h relief. 
When drv, the rai,^i;ed ed^es and sharp points can be removed 
bv sandpaperini; the desit?n liijhdv with a piece of fine sandpaper. 
COLORING AND GLAZING - Where the richer color 
eHects in lexton.- nlicf ornament are desired, oil colors are 
us.-d Best r<sultv ar.- obtained in this work by applying a coal 
of Textone si/e or lead and oil paint over the section of wall 
surface after the stencil design has been used. 

When the si/e or paint is drv, the original stencil is placed 
over the relief desi-n and the varii>us parts stippled or painted 
in ditferent colors uith a small brush. Subdued, mell.)W color 
ctlects are obtained bv then applvmg a coat of tinted glaze 
^^l,,,, ,He color apphcatum .s dry. The glaze is partially re 
moved bv uipini^ with a cU)th. 

\ntique finishes are obtained by dmting dry rottcnstonc on 
to the glazed surface after the glaze has pardally set. When the 
.la/e is entirelv drv, the surface is rv.bbed vigorouslv with a 
dotlv to remove anv excess rottenstone. 



11 

Hi 

II 



VN^VN/WVV 





\ mm J 

JL 

^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f I ^ 



DECORATIVE FINISHES 

GLAZING & ANTIQUING 



G LAZ ING, 
BLENDING 

ana 

ANT lO U ING 
METHODS 




Fird sandpaper the dry Texiorvt .'iurfacc lightly to remove 
sharp nibs and points. Then apply a coat of Textone Sealer 





After t^ialmg upjii > n >''it "j <t>>ii uIok ni,<} nnnwlmh i . 

the desired blending col<frs nt irregtdar patches as ind/rdtul ahon 




The inac/i color i<hould be brushtd in around the ispots. \V i pt n ifh a 
cloth to blend the vanoaa colors and ri titoit acesa color fro/n high .spn(,- 



• The use of Textone Glaze o\(t textured 
Textone surfaces results in the beautiful an- 
tique cffecis found on some rough textured 
wall -^luiaees in ancient Euiupean buildinqv. 
However, the use of Textone Glaze is not ton- 
fined to the reproduction of antique wall treat- 
ment^. It i^ dlso used to j^ruduce some ol the 
numerous rich modern twcj- or -more -toned 
color and texture effects. 
DIRECTIONS — First the lexione surface is 



sealed with Jextcjue Sealer or a ( oat (j1 Hat oil 
paint. 1 lien c(j]or< eiijund in oil are added lo 
lexione Glaze. 1 lii^ tinted ^laze i^ then ap- 
plied t(j the wail. It 1- allowed to set until it 
h'((jnie^ sliizhlly lack\. i he '-uriac c i^ then 
wiped with (lean ( lodi^ to remove the gla/<* 
hfjm the hiirh liulit^. Seveial ( olor^ ma\ \yr ap- 
fjlied to the wall by mixing various colors in 
^e[)arate container^, and doing the color blend- 
ing on the wall a^ ijlustraied in pieinre^ afxne. 



38 



MAINTENANCE METHODS 

WASHING • REPAINTING 




• Surfaces painted with Texolite, Texolite Deep Colors 
and Duracal (washable calcimine) may be cleaned by 
washing. For best results, by which is meant least labor, 
maximum brightness after cleaning and long life for the 
paint itself, the simple instructions ir'ivcn below should 
be followed. 

WASH LIGHTLY— DON'T SCRUB- Modern water- 
thinned washable paints do not catch and hcjld dirt 
deeply embedded to the extent freciuently experienced 
with oil base paints. The latter produces a film that is 
first tacky, then resilient, and fmally (when the life has 
gone out of the vehicle by oxidation) brittle and chalky. 
Dirt and dust can easily become imbedded or impressed 
in this type of film, requiring a real scrubbing action to 
lift it off. 

Texolite and Duracal employ a vcliicle that is bone 
hard when dry. It forms an exceedingly thin binding film 
over the pigment itself. This film is never tacky, and it 
dries so quickly that dust docs nut adhere during the 
short painting period. The hard surface when dry does 
not provide embedment for dirt. Hence scrubbing is 
wholly unnecessary. The nerd for cleaning is long de- 
ferred. 

At the same time scrubbing is likely to harm the paint. 
These modern vehicles tend to soften and become tender 
when wet, much like a photographic film, though they 
are not soluble in water. This softening is increased if the 
water is made alkaline with soap. Rayon articles have the 
same characteristic, and must be washed with care as 
they temporarily lose strength when ^\et. Because of this 
characteristic scrubbing may remove or wear away the 
softened film. 

PROPER METHOD OF WASHING— The following in- 
structions should be obscr\'ed in the maintenance and 
cleaning of surfaces painted with any USG washable 
water-thinned paint: 

1 . Sponge surface lightly, using a soft sponge or cloth and 
plenty of water. Use a small amount of mild soap if 
necessary to loosen the dirt. 

2. First washing of Texolite or Duracal should not occur 
until the paint is several months old (as the film 
hardens with age). It is good practice on first washing 
to add 2 to 3% of ordinary 40% drug store formalde- 
hyde to the washing water. This prevents the paint 
film from absorbing water and toughens its resistance 
to abrasion. 



3. Always start at the bottom of a wall, working up, so 
that dirty water, running down from the sponge, w ill 
not wet the dry wall below in streaks and soften the 
paint unevenly. Beginning at the bottom allows the 
excess water to run over a uniformly wet surface from 
which it can l^e gently mopped awav without lca\in'j^ 
streaks. This is also good practice for \\alls {tainted 
with oil paints or cniuneLs. 

CLEANING WITHOUT WASHING -Wall pa per clean- 
ers may be used to renew the ori'^in.il colors of Texolite 
and Duracal. Follow manufacturer's instnu-tions. 

REDECORATING— In most rerued space, as in apart- 
ments, ofhces, shops, etc., the cost of washing any painted 
surface is almost as great as the cost of redecorating with 
USG washable, water-thinned paints. The Ia!)or cost is 
practically identical; the only extra iirm is the aM of 
the paint itself, and this is sut priMU'^K- low. .Xnd with 
tlicse paints there is no aftermath of odor nor an\' hjss of 
occupancy. 

The advantages are obvious: Tenants appreciate the 
landlord's care and attention to the appearance of the 
premises. They like the sense of newness and freshness 
that repainting implies. And when space is \a{ated, 
the new tenant can have the color scheme he wants — 
a great good-will builder— at practically the same cost 
to the management as a thoroui^h cleaning' of the tjjd 
surfaces. 



TO BUILDING MANAGERS— U you. have never used 
USG paint products, test their economy by putting them 
on your painting schedule for a comparative performance 
study against the interior wall and ceiling finishes vou 
now use. Watch four things: (1) Actual net cost of paint- 
ing (including scaffolding, cleaning up and total laljor 
time consumed); (2) Drying time, or time hjst to tenants 
during work, including time to free premises of objection- 
able paint odors; (3) Total cost, including intermediate 
washing, as compared to other paints; and (4) Satisfac- 
tion of tenants with the clear colors and superi(jr lii^ht 
reflection of these water-thinned p.iirus, and their relii-f 
at the freedom from interference with normal use and 
occupancy of their premises. 

Such a test, made in any representati\e x-ction of your 
building, will demonstrate the etonomy and renting 
advantages tjf I'^Ci paints compounded by the new prin- 
ciple presented in this nianual. 



39 



Jta^ 



w 




USG MILL^ AND WAREHOUSES FROM 
COAST-T>j- COAST MANUFACTURE AND 

DISTRIBUTE BUILDING MATERIAL-. 
THE U-G LINE IXC:LUDES: 



• WaDboanls: Sbccaoct* 



•- -.-J' Sr^- 



- f A-^- 




V 



6